Say What! NBA Player Chris Bosh’s Baby Mama Applies For Food Stamps

Rucuss staffJune 18, 2012

It’s no secret that Miami Heat star Chris Bosh and the mother of his first child don’t get along.

Bosh and Allison Mathis have been going to battle in court for the last two years from child support to banning her appearance on VH1’s Basketball Wives. Bosh loss his latest court battle with Mathis last week when a judge agreed that their three-year old daughter should not attend the Olympics in London.

The judge said the couple is still free to hash out their own agreement outside of court. But that appears to be unlikely especially with Mathis financial troubles. Mathis has lost her job and is on the verge of losing her home. According to Gossip Extra, she just filed for food stamps.

According to Gossip Extra:

In her first interview about the legal battle that Bosh and former live-in galpal Allison Mathis have been waging in three states, Matthis’ lawyer tells me Orlando resident Mathis was laid off from her gig as a secretary in a construction company and this week applied for federal food assistance.

Mathis is also expecting to see her home go into foreclosure because the child support Bosh is paying doesn’t cover her mortgage.

Bosh pays $2,600-a-month in child support but according to state guidelines, someone like Bosh whose yearly salary is in the $18 million-range should be paying about $30,000-a month.

What’s more, the tall-head’s request to take his and Mathis’ three-year-old daughter to London this summer to watch him play in the Olympics has been denied by an Orlando judge.

“He wants to take his daughter across the world for a photo op,” said Orlando family law attorney Jane E. Carey. “It’s just for a photo op. He doesn’t care. He hasn’t been decent to my client and his daughter.”

“My client just lost her job and applied for food stamps for her and Mr. Bosh’s daughter. She’s about to be foreclosed on, he won’t help her and all he wants to do is go to London with his daughter. Are kidding?”

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